POST #4: Copyright

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Re: POST #4: Copyright

linda beu
This module was an eye opener and a little frightening actually.  I think we are so very fortunate to have the resources available through AEA that are safe an easily accessed by teacher and student alike.  I can't imagine why anyone would use any other source and take a chance of any kind.  I learned so much on a personal level I think this course was valuable for that reason alone.  I will not be able to use much of what I learned but this one was beneficial.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Katrina Klingenberg
In reply to this post by eabbey
The section regarding copyright has helped me to better understand the laws regarding copyright. Since I teach Preschool almost everything I use with my students is within the classroom setting. I do sometimes share information with parents, so it is good to have more information about copyright laws. I will use the AEA Online resources more often since they offer safe ways to access information and show it legally. I also feel the resources offered through AEA Online will be "safer" because they are filtered. I try to always preview what I pull up on my Promethean Board, but it will give me more "piece of mind" to use the AEA Online resources - so I don't get any unwanted surprises :).
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Dani Topping
In reply to this post by eabbey
As a history major, copyright has always been a issue that I have had to deal with in some form or another.  I was pretty confident in my choices before the copyright section, and the material reaffirmed that.  However,  I am concerned that in my role as substitute I might find that a lesson plan infringes on copyright laws, and how to handle that.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Linda E.
In reply to this post by eabbey
As a former magazine editor and now a freelance writer, I'm familiar with copyright and understand why it exists, as every editor and writer signs a contract outlining usage agreements. It was enlightening, though, and encouraging, to get up to speed on how copyright law is evolving and attempting to keep pace with the digital world. Creative Commons is a logical and useful tool for making permission to use resources in the classroom easier. As a potential teacher of journalism, I know the importance of being able to tell a multimedia story, and students now do so all the time. Resources for those stories need to align with copyright law, though, and AEA resources take away some of the worry involved. As a journalism instructor, I'd be teaching copyright law to students, so I bookmarked all of the course links on the topic. It's such a natural thing for students to want to use Pharrell's "Happy" or whatever other tune is current in a presentation. But they also need to understand the rules around it and why they exist, as they'll be encountering them for themselves outside the classroom at some point. One of the lesson plans I used as a former journalism teacher included an initial student writing assignment. I then posed a series of questions on how the student author would feel if I took that article and used it in a variety of ways without their permission. Copyright concerns became quite clear when the work was their own.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

sjones44
In reply to this post by eabbey
I have to agree with some others who remember the "fear of copyright laws" constantly thrown at us in high school and college. I am also a former music teacher and music adjudicator who had these laws stressed  over and over. With my ESL students writing papers in middle school and high school classes in a second language, it was too easy to copy what others had written, not knowing what was acceptable or not. Now they will have the AEA copyright resource that will spell out for them whether or not it is legal to use. I now look at the copyright laws in a new light, knowing that our AEA is our friend.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Craig Althof
In reply to this post by eabbey
Being a writer, musician and licensed BMI music publisher, I’m fairly familiar with copyright. But the rules have changed with the proliferation of copyrighted material on the internet. The AEA online resource eliminates guesswork and accidental “oops” copyright infringements. A key reminder: just because someone else infringed on copyright and published an unauthorized protected work, it is still not “OK” to use that material from that source. “Two wrongs don’t make a right”.

Educators must champion responsible researching and copyright-protected material usage. Champion by example: when we use copyrighted material, point out that it is protected by copyright. Then, explain why it is OK under copyright law to use the material the way you have.

For student usage, here’s a powerful learning moment that hits students where it matters, food for thought for those who can use it.

“Retire” a wildly popular performer who is in their prime by announcing that you just read that _______ (an artist who is hot with students, NOT your favorite!) has announced they will no longer record, and no longer do live tours because they can’t afford to. They have to get a haircut and get a real job. Then play the segment:

(1) Music playing, with video of a rave going on, kids obviously enjoying themselves
(2) Transition to kid walking down the road digging some tunes via earbud
(3) Text slide, with music continuing but faded:
Creators of music get paid a few cents for each sale of their music.
They rely on that income to live, it means food for their families. Believe it or not, performers do NOT get rich from live shows!
As long as they get paid so they can eat, they can create more new music for people to enjoy.
Copyright law makes it ILLEGAL to copy a protected piece of music or a protected text.
But there’s more at stake than not breaking the law….
(4) Back to the rave scene and music, then BAM…darkness and silence.
(5) Text slide: Don’t let your favorite music die! Support musicians and artists. DON’T STEAL the food off their table!
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Terry Lee Wilhite
In reply to this post by eabbey
After doing the reading, I think I will be bolder in the use of information found on the internet.  If used in the classroom only, and the amount is not that great, I think the information would greatly enhance the learning of the students.  In the past I would seldom come close to the line of infringing on the copyright law.  I think I missed out on resources that were available.  By searching through the AEA site, most if not all of the work is done for me.  And yes, subs like me can think idealistically until we get our own classroom...but when I do...my plans are in place to use all that I can to make the best classroom possible.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Jeff Moreau
In reply to this post by eabbey
Copy Right is something that I have not really ever worried about.  I have not printed anything off the internet and used in class that did not come off of my resources.  My school has purchased license for the materials that I need.  It is safer for me to use those resources to cover my standards and benchmarks.  It is helpful however that there is a place where I can go (AEA online) for supplemental resources.  I have not really looked to deeply into the possibilities with AEA online.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Sheri Stratman
In reply to this post by eabbey
Since it has been a LONG time since I was a full time music teacher, it has been a while, since I have had to deal with copyright issues, but I do remember writing for permission to copy out of print music, wondering if the arrangements I was writing myself were legal, and other such issues.   Since then copyright has become much more confusing with all the digital media.  I was glad to see that there were cases in which copyright law was actually less restricted than I thought, but I would definitely feel  more comfortable using resources like Soundzabound in my classroom to demonstrate musical style than taking a chance at using something inappropriately off of the internet.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Stacia Walker
In reply to this post by eabbey
Taking this course has greatly improved my knowledge of copyrights.  I think in the past I have always been scared of copyrights, but now I realized they are more flexible than I originally thought.  I will be using the Iowa AEA Online much more since I know the information has been weeded through.  I am always so hesitant to use certain searched on the internet because I don't know for sure how reliable some of it is.   It is great that there is a centralized location I can go to and know I am getting reputable sources.  I also see this as a tool to have my older students access and it is a great lesson to show them how to use sources and they will be able to use this skill for a long time to come.  I believe in this day and age it is vital for students to learn this skill of how to search for information on the internet and how to abide by the copyright laws.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Valerie Hagensick
In reply to this post by eabbey
  The copyright module gives a great lesson on being fair to authors. It is a great lesson to present to the classroom. Authors deserve to recieve credit for their work. It is our responsibility to make sure that credit is given, not only by educators, but the students as well. It is a matter of being respectful to the writer. Following the guidelines helps prevents breaking the law and paying a fine or serving a prison term. Having AEA Online Resources is great way to find infromation and to be reassured that it was found in a legal and  responsible way. I have been reminded that books could not be copied and reproduced when there has not been enough to go around the classroom. At the time, I did not give it a thought that it was not legal. I was trying to think of a way to get enough marterial so every student would have a copy. I have seen in teachers manuals on the bottom of a page that that page could be copied. Only the pages that have that written on it, is legal to be copied, not every page. This module was a good reminder on what can be legally reproduced.      
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Tim Marsden
In reply to this post by eabbey
As always, I think it is a good time for teachers and many professionals to revisit Copyright and all that goes along with it.  As a music teacher, and a performer, I have be aware of Copyright issues for many years.  The do's, don'ts, and cautions are important for everyone to know.  The last few years I have enjoyed checking out the Choral Music Public Domain library online.  I do like the fact that the Iowa AEA resources are safe and would be perfect for our student to use.  I also appreciate the review of using the advanced search in google to find the "safe" resources so that no copyright is infringed upon.  I will certainly be reminding students of this feature and when we do projects or posting of any kind we will visit about the copyright regulations.  This is an important part of digital citizenship that I feel needs to be taught to our young people.  Especially those going into the arts, but all students need to know and understand copyright.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Julia Evans
In reply to this post by eabbey
I felt I had a good understanding of Copyright and its place in education.  After completing this module, I feel surprised at how little I really knew.   I now have a better understanding of the copyright, fair use and creative commons then I did previously to this module.  As a Family and Consumer Science teacher we do a great deal of pulling in information from a variety of sources.  I am much more comfortable with my legally using information and sharing with students what is appropriate and what is not.  It is so much more far reaching than I knew.  I was not even really sure of penalties, if any.   Responsible teachers need to model fair use so that students will follow their example.  
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Michele Busch
In reply to this post by eabbey
After going through the module of copyright laws I have a better understanding of what I can and can't do. I was also a relief to learn that it's not as restrictive as I once thought it was. I will now try to use the AEA online resources more to help me in finding information and materials needed for my lessons.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Michele Busch
In reply to this post by eabbey
After going through the module of copyright laws I have a better understanding of what I can and can't do. I was also a relief to learn that it's not as restrictive as I once thought it was. I will now try to use the AEA online resources more to help me in finding information and materials needed for my lessons.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Michele Busch
In reply to this post by eabbey
After going through the module of copyright laws I have a better understanding of what I can and can't do. I was also a relief to learn that it's not as restrictive as I once thought it was. I will now try to use the AEA online resources more to help me in finding information and materials needed for my lessons.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Teresa Sandidge
In reply to this post by eabbey
I agree with the other posts as far as obtaining a more knowledgeable grasp of copyright. As I have mentioned before using the media on the AEA website makes planning more efficient. Add the copyright issue; it has already been reviewed. No wasting of time searching other sites and wondering if you are breaking laws concerning copyrights. Safe site for students to use also. then there is the issue of other sites being blocked. With the media online the extra searching through multiple sites is reduced
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Karen Woodward
In reply to this post by eabbey
The copyright module was very helpful in better understanding our rights and responsibilities concerning copyrights.  As a music educator and church musician, I have always been careful about copying octavos, solos, accompaniments, CD's, etc...  I also have relatives/friends who make a living as composers/arrangers, so we have had many conversations about copyright infringements.  And now, having just read the copyright module, and seeing how the AEA online resources can help, it indeed is a good feeling.  I also must be aware, as a substitute teacher now, to talk with students in a classroom, who might be infringing on use of copyrighted materials.  
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Ashley Mangan
In reply to this post by eabbey
After taking this course, I feel like I have a better understanding of copy right laws.  It is always good to review copy right laws as an educator.  We are constantly trying to pull in new and relevant information for students to grasp a new concept from but it is important to remember the appropriate way to use and share the information with the student.  When using other peoples resources with students and staff, I will make sure to always cite the resource and show where the resource comes from.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Dorothy DeGroot
In reply to this post by eabbey
I was not as familiar as I wanted to be with Creative Commons.  This is a resource becoming so much more needed in the “age of digital citizenship”.  I will be better able to access, explain, and apply the different types of Creative Commons licenses.  Teachers may have little idea of the different levels of licenses and how sharing/copyright are not all or nothing fair use issues.  I was not clear about the difference between a mashup (combination of different material to compose something new) and a remix (re-edit an existing work).  I also was only vaguely familiar with the fact that works could be used if they are being parodied, commented on, critiqued, or used as an illustration to make a point or remixed for a transformative/different purpose.  Is that how Jimmy Fallon gets a mashup of President Obama or Brian Williams "singing" the words to a current favorite song? I also am better able to explain the idea of:  it’s not so important how much of the resource is being used…rather it is important to gauge whether/if the HEART of the work is included…which, even in a few brief seconds, might cause copyright violation.  I am thinking of “It’s all about that bass”…those few words from that song seem (to me) to be the unique and often repeated part of the song.  Copyright  violation in 5 words??  These new issues need discussion, clarification, and the willingness to “do the right thing”.  Always a good example/model for a teacher to believe and to follow!
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