POST #4: Copyright

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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Lisa Quartucci-Turbett
I was not aware of all the copyright laws when it comes to the classroom.  I am aware of copyright laws in general, but never thought that it would apply to the classroom.  Since reading about it, I have been much more thoughtful about what I should use.  It has taught me that I should use the AEA Online Resources because they have already filtered through the information.  It will make my task easier as far as what I should and should not use.  I have always assumed that if it was for the good of my class, I could use it.  I will be more careful as far as what I should and should not use.  I assumed that if I wasn't using it for profit or trying to take credit for it, that it would be ok to use.  I think this is a topic that many teachers are not aware of.  
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Kyle Billups
In reply to this post by eabbey
The copyright module was very helpful in trying to solidify what is acceptable practices and what is not.  I felt as though I was pretty confident and competent when it came to written materials.  I may not have known the name of the law behind the rules but I was aware of what my limits were.  I feel like this is largely the case because until recently we have been more linked to written literature.  What I felt was the most interesting/informational was how the rules apply to audio and visual materials. The Creative Commons and how it affects a classroom.  I think one of the major issues that students need to be aware of is how they use google images to find pictures for projects.  I feel like the majority of people feel that these images are free for the taking and thus need to educated about proper protocol.  I also feel like students may need further training when embedding videos in certain class projects.  I know many teacher websites that have embedded videos as well that probably are unaware of protocol that goes with embedment of videos.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Dolores King
In reply to this post by eabbey
As an educator, I was aware that there were copyright laws, but was actually ignorant regarding them.  I knew that there were pages I could not copy for whole class use and that one couldn't claim a song or music that someone else had composed.  Being able to use AEA Online as a resource will allow me access to a lot of material that I had thought to be prohibited.  Thanks to the resources provided, I can feel comfortable and reassured that the sources I intend to use are safe and legal.  As I recall some of the things I copied for the classroom, I am wondering how much in violation of copyright laws I actually was.  Using the AEA resources will be a safeguard as I continue to use these in the learning and teaching in the classroom.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Kari Moret
In reply to this post by eabbey
I always felt daunted by copyright laws which made me extremely leary to look for things on the internet to use in my lessons.  However, after reading through I realize it is not nearly as restrictive as I originally thought.  I feel much more comfortable looking through the AEA resources knowing that everything there is available for me to use as well as not having to worry about it be restricted by the school.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Julie Petersen
In reply to this post by eabbey
The copyright module was very interesting.  I feel like a lot of people know or are aware of copyright, but not necessary all the rules and consequences behind using a resource that is copyrighted.  I wasn’t aware of all the different copyright limitations such as Classroom Use, the TEACH act, and Fair Use.  Even though I teach preschool age, I really think grade level students need to be aware of what copyright is.  Many students just go to Google for images or use songs from YouTube.  I think this is why sharing the digital resources from Iowa AEA online would be very beneficial.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Stephanie McNeill
In reply to this post by eabbey
After taking this course, I have realized that the best way to have my students use online resources is to use the AEA Online Resources. For example, when the students use iClipart for their travel brochures, I will now have the confidence that they are using pictures correctly. It will also be beneficial for them to use CultureGrams when designing their travel brochures because then I know where the information came from and I will also know that they are getting the latest and correct up to date information. I will also show my students how they need to cite any information that is not their own. I also like how I can show the students Soundzabound so that they can use royalty free music for their videos that they produce each quarter for me. I always thought I understood the copyright laws but after taking this course, I realized that there was so much that I didn't know. I know that I will go back to the module and refer to that often so that I can teach the students the right way to do things so that they don't ever do something wrong and get in trouble for it.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Kelly Jones
In reply to this post by eabbey
i had very little understanding of the copyright laws and how they affected my classroom and the projects we would do.  After going through the copyright module, i have a better understand.  I would like to do a bit more research to further my understanding.  I do like that when i am on Iowa AEA online, that I do not have to worry about them.  From now on, i will use Iowa AEA online as the main resource for the projects that i work with  in the classroom.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Patty Wheeler
In reply to this post by aeverett
After reading through all the copywriter materials, I feel both nervous and relieved. Mostly relieved. Every computer class I have taken in the last few years would scare me to death. I was afraid someone would show up at the school and throw me in jail, even though I was doing everything right. The six standards helped explain all the does and don'ts of copywritten material and how to use it. I like that this is included in the research materials on the websites, so it is easier to determine if it can be used. I found out that it is not as strict as I was lead to believe. I feel more comfortable in both my use and my student's use of materials. It will be hard to have my students switch over to using this site because they are so used to googling everything. In their minds, it is "just faster". I need to explain that the AEA search has taken all the questions of reliability out for them and there is no doubt if it is true or not.  I will have my students use more of the programs in the AEA online program to avoid any thoughts of misuse of materials. This resource has done a lot to help educators to help students avoid copywriter infringement and helped lessen the burden of teachers having to ask permission for everything. I am so glad I took this class, it has opened up a lot of new resources for my students and me.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Carol Christian
In reply to this post by eabbey
After completing the copyright section of the course, I felt I gained a great deal of insight on copyright in general and what it means for me as an educator. I liked how the course explained the different issues within the topic of copyright too. I have a better understanding of how my students and I can or cannot use copyrighted material in the classroom.  

The Fair Use and Classroom Use sections of this course put my mind at ease, regarding many of the materials I use in my classroom.  On the other hand, this course also reminded me of how serious copyright restrictions are and how important it is to be aware of these regulations and the rights of the creators.  

I know that I will be using the Iowa AEA Online resources more often now to locate classroom materials online.  The site offers many ways to access materials for me to use with my students, without the added worry of copyright issues.  
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Meredith Sulentic
In reply to this post by eabbey
After reviewing the copyright section of this module, I have an better understanding of how copyright should be. The posters that were on the modules clearly stated the different icons and each of their purpose of copyright. If I were an classroom teacher or doing an long term substitute, I would use that poster and find several examples of right way to copyright and what not to show the students. I also would explain to them what each icon means and their purpose.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Matt Amundson
In reply to this post by eabbey
After completing the Copyright section of this course I feel much more comfortable and have a better understanding of the restrictions.  Having the source such as the AEA website and the material that is provided for us there is amazing.  Knowing that the students are not just doing a random google search for what they are looking for and have a material at the AEA website that will be useful.  As a teacher, it is important to prepare preview material before student use to prepare for any questions and make sure the students are going to find/learn what you want them to.  Also, being aware of the Fair Use Act, and the 10% rule is important bits of information that is worth teaching and discussing with the students.  Being aware of these things will impact my teaching and it is important for students to be aware also.  
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Lynelle Bjoin
In reply to this post by eabbey
After completing the copyright module, I realize there is a lot I didn't know about copyright laws before, and even though I've learned a lot, there's still some gray areas that are hard to remember and understand. Learning about Fair Use, Classroom Use, and TEACH was helpful. I will keep in mind and refer to the guidelines for different media types from the Best Practices Approach by American University. The Fair Use Analytical Tool from the University of Minnesota may be helpful also. It helps a teacher decide whether something is Fair Use or not. As I approach a new school year with classroom materials and the way I use them and have students use them, I will definitely think more about copyright laws, and knowing that the Iowa AEA online resources allow for K-12 use and have copyright provisions, I will use them much more. Soundzabound and iClipart are royalty free. The content provided through the AEA online resources is relevant and is linked to Iowa and National learning standards. The online resources help students with different learning styles and both teachers and students can save information if they make a personal account in some of the resources. It's comforting to know that the sites are safe for students, the content is good quality and true, and it's nice to know advertising will not pop up as students are searching. These benefits are not all true when using the general web.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

RYAN SLATTERY
In reply to this post by eabbey
After completing the copyright module I feel more comfortable searching out and sharing online articles, images, videos and other resources with my students. Having little prior knowledge of copyright and fair use regulations I always felt uncomfortable integrating online resources into my classroom in a significant way and therefore usually kept my resources to print publications. As an art teacher one of the biggest battles I fight is with kids trying to copy instead of create. I am always running into problems with kids searching out artistic images on the internet, copying them wholesale, and then trying to pass the work off as their own. By having a better understanding of copyright and fair use regulations I feel I can better communicate to the kids why this can't be done beyond the fact that if they are doing that they aren't creating their own art.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Patrick Flanagan
In reply to this post by eabbey
Copyright is a serious issue to me. I have had some colleagues who have trampled over copyright in the past. I did like the fact that most teachers err on the side of safety. That make sense to me.

The section of classroom use was refreshing to read and put aside some of my concerns. The fact that the use must be in person and in the classroom helps me focus my use efforts and ensures that I will keep things in the classroom. Of course the challenge is to get my students to understand the use of stuff on the web and just cutting a pasting a video for a presentation may not be best. Helping them understand and appreciate classroom use and fair use is going to be so much easier with the help of these AEA resources.

This module really helped with the concurrent classes I teach. The little nuts and bolts of the laws and understanding them helps. I now know why a teacher can no longer just make their own anthology.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Patrick Flanagan
In reply to this post by RYAN SLATTERY
Writing teachers also have this issue. It sometimes gets to the point of absolute frustration. We had a teacher on staff say, "they won't hand it in unless someone else created it." That is a very bad place to be. We are struggling to get our administration to fully address it. They are supportive of grade consequences, but shy to address it on a whole school basis.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Katherine (Kathy) Reckling
In reply to this post by eabbey
I don't think my understanding has necessarily changed but grown in print and online resources after receiving the materials in this course. I still sense a gap in getting students to a place of understanding that meets the laws and ethical "codes," sometimes.  Based on health class participant evidence, Ss receive instruction in copyright law/plagiarism education, but many still seem to not understand how to find reliable, and how to credit, resources.  I will take what I have learned in the AEA course (as I have done with mandatory reporter, OSHA, and EEOC training) and use those "modules" in classes when appropriate.  Ss see what I am required to take to keep licensure, relevant and then they also see what is necessary in career application (present and future considerations).  

I can also reduce the waste of trees in using online resources, links.  In the past 5 years I have considerably reduced paper materials use, but need to do more to reduce printed materials and thus respect copyright laws (and my carbon footprint)

In my disciplines, particularly, people recycle ideas, and we need to lead Ts and Ss to the original idea, source.  SIRS researcher will help Ss and Ts, versus using a general Google search (trying to pick the .orgs from other sources).  In our classes, we can take advantage of the Learn 360 video repository with built in citation tools.

Lastly, another way to teach the importance of citing sources and to respect boundaries is through the creation of personal stories. (Love the idea of creating "It's Your Cause" videos!)  We teach (stress) to Ss in this digital/Snapchat age to have others ask for permission to access what is "there's."  We can connect copyright laws to personal boundaries, having Ss be the "gatekeepers" to who has permission or "rights" to access to that information.      

I am excited to spend more time researching the AEA resources released in this module, and will better understand how to transform classrooms to: respect copyright laws, to increase engagement, to transfer ownership in teaching and learning, and to reduce anxieties for students who can demonstrate knowledge and understanding, but don't wish to verbally share out in doing so.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Shawn Behne
In reply to this post by eabbey
I am happy for the inclusion of the Copy Right module in this course. After having completed it I have much better understanding of copy right laws and their implications in my classroom. I found most helpful the sections on fair use and creative commons. I had seen CC on some materials and had some sense that it had to do with copy right, but had no idea what it meant. Now I do. This information will be very helpful. I have always thought that for the most part my use of materials in my classroom has met the standards of copy right laws. Now I feel more confident about it. One area though where I have been lax is in the use of images in my creating materials. To help with this I will make better use of iclipart. I was also happy to learn about Google’s usage rights filter.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Bonnie Fegenbush
In reply to this post by eabbey
I have always done my best to follow the copyright laws, but I didn't understand all of them until I took this class.  I have had my students use AEA's clipart because of the copyright law.  I also have my students use soundzbound when they use music with their presentations.  My FCCLA members also use AEA's clipart when they are preparing for their district, state, and national competitions.  I know they can verify they have not used any material that is copyrighted.
The copyright laws are confusing. The lesson helped me understand the copyright laws. I think I will add a lesson for my students about copyright laws.  I will explain the importance of following the laws.  I also plan on adding a lesson going over all the online resources that are available to the students from Iowa AEA.  I thought I could prepare a scavenger hunt lesson about AEA online resources. I don't think my students understand why they need to follow the copyright laws.  As a teacher, I appreciate the opportunity to have the laws explained to me so I can share the information with my students.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Lori Wiley
In reply to this post by eabbey
    The information in the concerning copyright was extensive and quite helpful.  Even though I had minimal prior knowledge concerning this issue, I've adhered to a majority of the stipulations during my thirty year teaching career.  I will definitely take more advantage of the resources on Iowa AEA Online to avoid any potential conflicts.  In the past few years I've used many clips from You Tube using a general search.  I will now look on the sites offered by Iowa AEA Online to ensure adherence to copyright law.  Also, I will be sure to limit the time students have access to videos that I post on Schoology and guide my students who are creating digital stories, Power Points, etc...  to use Soundzabound and iClipart, and offer clear tutorials of how to access those sites.  I will also remember that it's better to link than to copy.  These are just a few of the ways this information will impact my future use in the classroom.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Kristin Dreyer
In reply to this post by eabbey
My understanding of copyright hasn’t changed with this course, but it definitely has been refined.  I had never heard of Classroom Use, TEACH, or Fair Use.  These three aspects of limitations we have on using copyright material in education really helped me sort out what I can or cannot use in my classroom.  It also helps me to think about the value of the resources I use in the classroom.  As a teacher, I will use more safety aspects with my searches of images, videos, and subject material for my students.  At the beginning of the year, I use a week to teach my students about digital citizenship.  We use the word plagiarism more than copyright, but I can now see how I could incorporate the concepts I learned in this course to help students understand safe use of the internet.  I was introduced to Creative Commons by a technology consultant through our AEA. I appreciated the refresher during this course, because it reminds me that I need to search the internet appropriately and teach my students the same lesson.  Teaching students to make good choices when choosing images, reading materials, videos, and information they find for note taking is very important in the digital age we live in.
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