POST #4: Copyright

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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Linda Whitford Longfield
This module on the intricacies of copyright laws was very dense, yet helpful.  There are so many different components to grasp and the legalities can be very confusing. I am slowly processing this complicated information about copyright law, public domain, fair use and Creative Commons.

One standard assessed for our report cards requires that students be evaluated on how well they “use many reliable print and digital sources” and how well they “determine accuracy and give credit to sources.” For my students to succeed, I will need to introduce them to the many resources on the AEA website and explicitly teach them about their proper use and the need to follow correct citation practices.
I will need to create a lesson where they learn how to responsibly use someone else’s work. They will need direct instruction on how to check who owns it, how to get permission to use it, and how to give credit to the original creator. Understanding the terms involved with copyright laws will be central to my teaching. I plan to teach about the words “copyright”, “fair use”, “public domain”, “Creative Commons”, “patent” and “trademark”.

With its nearly 8 million royalty-free images that teachers and students can use, iClipArt seems like a wonderful resource to introduce copyright and fair use. For instance, since my students have the tendency to automatically do a “Google search” when they need a picture and grab the first one they see, I plan to not only model safe digital citizenship by using iClipArt for that task, but also give them direct instruction on the use of this tool, including how to cite the source.  Teaching the rules and practices for the appropriate use of copyrighted digital materials will be an ongoing practice in my classroom.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Amy Lamoureux
In reply to this post by eabbey
I have always found copyright scary and quite a bit confusing.  I still have questions concerning right and wrong but feel more confident that I have been doing the right thing.  I now will definitely use these resources from the AEA library as they as they will be a safer environment the resources have already been sorted, filtered and copyright information there.  I use youtube videos a lot to teach concepts and now I will search them from the aea resources first just to be safe as well as videos, clipart and audio.  I am going to pay closer attention to the materials I am using and printing for classroom use.  However, I also know I can't only use AEA resources so I will need to be mindful of what I am looking at as well as using in the classroom.  I now notice the permission granted notices on certain printed materials for classroom use and need to be aware of those things that do grant permission and those that do not.
jw
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

jw
In reply to this post by eabbey
Before working through the copyright module I was one of the teachers who thought it was restrictive.  Now I have a better understanding.  Educators are really given quite a bit of flexibility when using works for educational purposes.  I now understand guidelines to make sure I am being fair when using certain resources, which works can be copyrighted, and resources to use in determining copyright.  Understanding copyright will make me much more mindful going forward!

AEA Online resources are less worrisome to use than a general internet search of resources for many reasons, copyright determinations being one.  
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Nikki Helm
In reply to this post by eabbey
After going through the copyright module, I feel I have a better understanding of what does and does not infringe upon copyright. Copyright isn't as strict as I thought it was, but I can see how it could easily be taken too far in the context of education, especially when it comes to linking to a resource. It’s also good to know that doing searches through these resources guarantees your students won’t stumble upon inappropriate content. It seems like this is becoming harder and harder to control. Knowing more about the resources that are available to us as educators, I know I will be more conscious of using those resources instead of just using Google searches to locate information. By using the online resources available to us, you can almost guarantee you won't be infringing upon copyright. I was surprised how specific the allocations for use of audio, images, and video were.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Stacie O'Dell
In reply to this post by eabbey
In this post, I will explain how my understanding of copyright changed. I will also explain what I will do with my approach with my classroom materials. I will explain what I will do with student use of our materials as well.

First, copyright has always been very confusing to me. There seemed to be many legal aspects. Whenever I wanted to copy something in the past, I would send it to our district print center. If there was a copyright issue they would notify me. Now, I feel much more informed. The Copyright BriefNOTES for Educators and Students brochure resource that was provided through this AEA self-paced course is so valuable. The questions and answer section, copyright law summary, helpful hints, and general copyright guidelines sections answer all of my questions.

Second, my approach to classroom materials has changed with this course. After reviewing all of AEA’s resources, I will use them exclusively in my classroom. I will refer to the brochure from the AEA to ensure that I follow the copyright rules for each resource. For example, BookFLIX and TrueFlix can’t be copied or redistributed. But, iCLIPART for Schools can have unlimited images, photos, and web art images downloaded for educational use.

Finally, student use of materials will change in my classroom as well.  I have never had a lesson with my students on copyright. I think that would be very appropriate to teach them in elementary school about the copyright laws and how they are affected by them. This is a lifelong thing they will need to know. My lesson would include not only how the copyright affects them in the classroom but also how it affects them as they are researching at home and using digital resources at home.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Dusty Krager
In reply to this post by eabbey
I definitely thought copyright laws were more restrictive in classrooms than they really are. I had no idea our AEA provided so many different ways to find information to present in our classrooms that do not infringe on any copyright laws. I now realize it is much safer, smarter, and valid to find resources such as audio books, videos, pictures, and research sites through our AEA digital resources. I am guilty of using videos such as Bill Nye in Science because of his engaging views on various topics, but I now see I have more options that do not put me at risk of not following copyright laws. I will keep in mind that I should only be using about 10% of materials that I have not sought permission to use, just to be cautious. I will also remember that if I am using a resource for direct educational purposes I am probably OK.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Julie Atkins
In reply to this post by eabbey
I have learned from the AEA Online Resources course, that it would be easier to use the information from the AEA Online Resources website.  I remember some of the copyright laws we had to watch out for and all the Works Cited pages created.  It was a long, lengthy process.  I haven't had to think about copy right laws for decades.  I just followed the teachers lesson plans and assumed they had that covered.  

This course did refresh and update my thoughts on the copyright laws.  I was not up to date with the online stuff at all.  I had no knowledge or do not remember anything about Fair Use or Creative Commons laws.  We were taught to take a sentence or paragraph and rewrite it in our own words.  I found this course very interesting and it showed me so much about online resources and the copyright information.  There was so much information, it is a lot to understand and digest.  I would have to really study this with my dyslexia, to try and get everything straight.  Itis a lot to learn and figure out.  The AEA Online Resource would be such a better, less complex way to get information to the students.  I think it opens up the learning fields for the teacher to give to the students.  They might not have to fear as much with, "Am I infringing on Copyrights?"  
I also would express to the students to make sure they are not plagerizing themselves or breaking the law with copyrights.  
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Mary Bousselot
In reply to this post by eabbey
Thank you for including the copyright module in this course! As many others have stated, copyright laws are confusing, and, as an educator, it is so important that were are good role models to our students in our use of materials. I didn't know that through the Fair Use law that teachers have more leeway to use resources in education. I appreciate the four criteria: 1. purpose, 2. nature of copyright work, 3. the amount used in relation to the whole, and 4. effect upon market in value of work when thinking about fair use. Teaching my students about copyright using the question-Are you being fair to the creator? will get them to think from the creator's perspective. I often use the adage "Put yourself in his/her shoes" so it will work here as well. Students are so accustomed to 'copy and paste' so educating them on copyright is essential.

I use google classroom so it is easy to share a link with students, which this module has taught me is better than copying the material to share with students. As my students research topics to share or present, I will teach them about public domain and Creative Commons.

Lastly, I truly appreciate the wide range of resources available to us through Iowa AEA online. It is comforting knowing that my students and I can use them during our time together knowing that they are fair and reputable sources.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Jill Roberts
In reply to this post by eabbey
Before I began the course, I felt I had a pretty good knowledge of Copyright. After taking this course I became more familiar with some of the terminology and gave me an update of some of the more modern technology such as using videos. To be honest, maybe I have been a little too strict with copyright throughout the buildings I work in. I guess I have heard too many horror stories of districts having to pay massive fines when they would purchase one copy of a piece of software and then install it throughout a whole computer lab. I do also remind students to see the citation tools that are within the databases by saving them to their Google Drive and then add them to their works cited page. As the technology progresses and teachers use things from all over the web, I find it harder to track and many teachers still feel they do not always need to acknowledge where they get their pictures and teaching materials. It is a work in progress, I send out the reminders a few times each year and hope for the best!
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Amy Hutcheson
In reply to this post by aeverett
My understanding of copyright has changed because I feel I need to be extremely careful in what I share and show and use as a resource. I have lately been asking the resource author more often if I am allowed to use their information. I’ve learned that the practice of Fair Use gives me a little more leeway but I will now and in the future use more of the AEA online resources for that piece of mind. I can also ask our media specialist if I am uncomfortable or uncertain about the use of something. My physical education students don’t use resources on the internet that could cause issues with copyright rules and regulations, however, if I do projects in the future that would need information I would use the AEA online site for resources I knew was safe for everyone involved.
Something really interesting and new I learned is that the symbol © does not need to be present or be filed by the U.S. copyright office and that personal works are already considered copyrighted. That was an “aha” moment- I need to be very careful with any type of use. It’s very important to give credit to the source and with permission even for copies, showing, listening to or even performing. A use of these things need either to be bought for this use, or given permission to use.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Lisa Havlicek
In reply to this post by eabbey
Upon reviewing the Copyright moduleI realized that many teachers use materials
that they probably shouldn't in the form they are using them. For instance, teachers should not show a recorded lesson or videos for students who may have missed a day or were absent.  That happens all the time at my school.  Also for best practice teachers should include within their syllabus warnings that students are not allowed to re-use the resources outside the classroom. This will protect the teacher from the beginning.  Teachers just need to give warnings to students about copyrighted material because even taking screenshots can be a copyright issue that will fall back on the user, not the teacher. We do American Gothic Parodies in 4th grade. A parody is not copyright because it will fall under the Fair Use act.  Many things fall under the Fair Use act and students and teachers just need to use common sense when they use resources.  Note where their information came from and use links.  Using links and embedding videos under the Creative Commons act will be blessed with permission from the creator.  The best part about all of this is that AEA Online has sorted and filtered the copyrighted material and it is labeled so the material that you can use is all ready to go. Very convenient for school age children.
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