POST #4: Copyright

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Re: POST #4: Copyright

yopeanuts
I've always known the basics of the copyright laws. This class has helped me understand it better, and this class has helped me understand the copyright laws used for online materials. I plan to utilize the AEA resources more frequently instead of just doing a search online or using youtube. Many of the classroom materials I need can be found at the AEA online website. It's easy to use and easy to navigate. It has up-to-date information and many choices available.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

KATHLEEN BESCO
In reply to this post by eabbey
I have been careful through the years of copyrighted materials.  I appreciate the definitions and clarifications of the information in the copyright module.  I found the section in public domain and copyright and fair use to be of interest.

Google is so quickly use as a resource for information. One of the most important lessons learned is there is a better way to access information through the AEA online resources.  The fact that students will receive credible, reliable, and filtered information.  In the future I will not select the web to start my search, rather the AEA Online.  I will continue to inform students the need to cite the origins of the materials they use.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Sandi Benge
In reply to this post by eabbey
I was thrilled to take this class. I have learned so much, that it is hard to comprehend it all unless you are using it daily. In English they are teaching the students about plagiarism. They have the students do their essays etc online and send it to the teacher through chrome program. That program checks for plagiarism and will reject the paper if it has been copied. That is so cool what technology can do now these days.
I am a Para-Educator at the High School, now that I know about the copyright law I should be able to help the student more and guide them through the safe course of using AEA-online sources for digital library and copyright material. It is so nice that AEA has free online resources for the Iowa Schools. They have already saved us the worry and headache of getting permission of using the fair-act for us all. This will give me the knowledge to be able to help teachers download databases and share resources with our students and teach them how to find useful intelligent sources. The English teacher was using one of the sites through BookFLIX, and I was amazed at the comparison and information she shared with the kids. They loved it, and in the mean time it was preparing them for some of the scenes we will be working on. AEA keep up the good work for us, and thank you.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Angela McDonald
In reply to this post by eabbey
I was blessed to have a teacher in college who was very good at communicating our abilities to copy as music educators. When I completed the copyright section of this course I noticed that many things I covered in college where just a review here. I find that often I do err on the side of not caution when I copy music and alway make sure I have at the number of originals for each person in orchestra before I make an extra copy for practice purposes. I don't think that this course changed much of my copying practices in orchestra.

I do however feel more comfortable using material on the database as a resource rather than using a search engine to gather information. I trust that the makers of these resource database have thought carefully about the content in the database and I look forward to using the aea site as a resource when I'm making lesson plan preparations.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Tammy Maaske
In reply to this post by eabbey
As an educator, copyright was a vague area for me to understand. I now have a better understanding of copyright. I thought I was more limited to the use of the different resources.  I was surprised to realize that any content can be displayed or performed in a classroom without breaking copyright. Also, I did not know that a teacher can not record resources for absent students to be watched the next day.  The punishment for copyright violation is hefty.  First, a cease and the desist letter will be sent and monetary damages assigned could range from $200-$150,000.  Payment for the plaintiffs attorney and court costs will have to be made as well as imprisonment sentences up to five years.  I am sure there are many educators that do not realize the importance of following copyright laws.  I do now!  

I did not think about copyright pertaining to online classes.  Copyright laws were not set up for digital education.  Teachers can now post content online for homework.  Also, educators teaching on line courses have to abide the many restrictions of copyright.  In this technological age, educators need to make sure they understand and follow copyright laws.

Copyright is very involved. Who would've thought a whole module would be related to copyright!
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Amy Roder
In reply to this post by eabbey
When I started teaching this was not a major concern, but now after 25 years a lot has changed.  After going through the module of copyright law, I am more conscious of following the rules.  I have to keep reinforcing myself to follow the rules.  From my in- service at school, I was shown several   things on copyright--creative commons. In using google, you need to use the advanced search in order to give credit to the author or etc.  I know see that AEA is also an option.  I can go to AEA online and do my searching for videos, pictures and etc.    AEA already did the filtering for  me and I can use that. This is something that I will be going over with my students as we do poetry unit.  The 10% rule is a good guideline to follow when showing videos and etc when necessary.  I know this is a section that I will be using and going over to show my students and myself the importance in following copyright laws.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Carol Ragan
In reply to this post by eabbey
Copyright law is confusing and I feel that with all the digital resources today it is even more complicated.  While we are thrilled with the easy access to information these days, it is important to know how it is legally and ethically correct to use.  This module helped to clarify many questions  and explained how resources can be grouped into categories.  I believe that this module is the kind of tool that educators will need to refer to whenever they have questions regarding copyright.  On the other hand, it is encouraging that educators have fewer restrictions than I thought before completing this module.  The classroom use of material is fairly unrestricted.  The Fair Use law allows teachers to make copies for class use.  The amount copied of course is limited.  The TEACH Act also is an important aspect for teachers to consider when using digital materials.  In general, educators are able to use and display many kinds of published works but when in doubt, use caution.  The penalties for infringement of copyright can be severe so it is definitely an important topic for educators in this digital age.  
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

RIZM
In reply to this post by eabbey
I have a better understanding of the copyright, fair use and creative commons then I did previously to this module.  As a para I'm usually not confronted with this as the teachers are.  I feel that it is important to stress to the students information about copyright and why you are allowed to use or copy something you are using in class.  Teachers need to model fair use so that students will follow their example.  As a para, I while guide and recommend that students use AEA online resources rather than google.  They will receive credible information and copyrighted material is sorted for them and labeled.  Material you can use is already to go.  Often times sites on google are blocked and you will not run into this with AEA resources.
I see mode of operation is to show no video.  I teach Pre-K and do not want to show entire works.  I will now be able to find smaller sections to use as jumping off points for learning.    about the children being able to read along with books.  This is a truly educational way to invite the children into books through technology.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

nabil talib majeed
In reply to this post by eabbey
I was thankful for the copyright module as some of the things became more clear for me about copyrights. I have always been careful about copyrights since I was a teacher in a middle school, secondary school, mechanical, electrical institute, substitute teacher, star talk program teacher for foreign language. Teaching the student often comes up about copying some materials for personal use. Some students and adults saw nothing wrong with copying (CDs) or tapes (this goes back a ways) and printed those materials for themselves and lots of others, but when you meet the graduate student who makes their living only by selling their materials as CDs or tapes or printed materials, you understand the reason for copyrights much better. The public domain was good to know about as well as the Fair Use Act. The question is your use of the materials “fair” to original creator or not and ten percent rule are good guidelines for thinking about this.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Cathie Tramontina
In reply to this post by eabbey
Undoubtedly, using the Iowa AEA online resources is a more secure environment for students than the internet.  If I were to become an employee with permission to use these resources I certainly would take advantage of this wonderful resource.  Iowa has taken the guess work out of the copyright process for teachers and students.  My reality still forces me to deal with the internet and to do the best job possible informing students on how to credit the resources they use.  Since taking this course I feel much more confident in guiding students, and have taken the time to think fairly about the resources I use.  I know I will be more conscientious in selecting materials for classroom use.

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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Lisa Streif
In reply to this post by eabbey
As a teacher and especially as a speech coach, I am very aware of copyright laws, but I did learn more from the copyright module. As I said in my last post, it is often difficult to find video, sound effects and/or music that are appropriate and copyright free for students to use in their speech events. Just doing a random Google search for video, images or music, one can’t always be sure if it is okay to ‘borrow’ what he finds. The AEA resources have a lot to offer, and there is no doubt that it is there to be used. Students need not worry about the legality of utilizing something they found on the AEA links. I am constantly reminding students that, if they use an idea or words that are not theirs, they need to give credit to the originator. Even if it is not a formal research paper, plagiarism is plagiarism—do not present someone else’s material as your own.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

K. Foster
In reply to this post by eabbey
I felt that some of the COPYRIGHT information was not very solid-way too many loopholes!  I am not too concerned about copyright infringements at my level.  Most resources I purchase or use are made with the intent of copying or using.

My students do research on an animal (non-domesticated) in first grade and then on a dinosaur in second grade, I now have better background knowledge of copyright regulations that I can share with my students.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Christine Davis
In reply to this post by eabbey
I have a much better understanding of what the copyright laws are and what they mean.  There are some areas where it seems they are not as restrictive as I had previously thought.  I believe it is much better for educators to utilize the AEA resources to find materials to use in their classrooms because all the copyrighted material is labeled.  It is also very easy to use the filters to sort the material quickly and easily.  There is so much material available in the AEA on-line resources it is difficult to grasp all of it.
I do believe that teachers will need to use these resources a section at a time so that they are able to comprehend all that is available.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Alan Pink
In reply to this post by eabbey
I've naively assumed that copyright is not a real big concern for most school districts where I've subbed.  That is, just about anything used in educational world was fair game.  Yes, taking an original work and stealing it or calling it your own is wrong but I haven't seen any of that in my limited experiences.  Any of the  copyright questions would fall outside of the illegal realm as they are merely copies or performances of protected works.  It has been interesting to see some Middle Schoolers deal with plagiarism while doing essays or writing papers.  Most merely subtract a word or two or switch some words around.  This would be a small subset of copyright issues but a lot of them are at least aware of it in this age of easy digital access to original works.  I've seen several instances where the DMCA might have been viloated with students using music or video in their own created works. The lines are sometimes blurred but I can be a little more vigilant and discuss with regular teachers.  It would always be a good idea to stick with the AEA online rsources.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Jon Wibbels
In reply to this post by eabbey
Copyright continues to be a timely topic as technology makes determining who owns what more and more complex. Over the years I have done a number of copyright workshops, I start with an overview of copyright law and then I cover specific topics including print, software, video, and more. I address new technologies used in schools and school libraries and also use case studies, real life questions and answers to typical copyright dilemmas faced by schools. My theory is that preventing a legal action is always simpler than defending it. I try to help schools take advantage of their rights under copyright law, while avoiding the “traps” that may make them targets for copyright owners.   The Iowa AEA Online copyright section does a very good job of giving schools the basics of copyright law as it may affect them in the classroom.  I am glad that the copyright section is a part of the Iowa AEA Online self-paced course. Because digital technology allows users to easily infringe on the copyright holders rights, it’s a great reminder of the teachers ethical duty to use “fair use” within the context of the law and the curriculum.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

MLaufenberg
In reply to this post by eabbey
When students come into my classroom, they already have their assignment and their research parameters given to them.  Most times their individual teachers have told them what sites they are allowed to use for their research so they can ensure factual information is used on their assignments, which also helps control copyright issues.  

Throughout this course I have discovered that copyright laws are not as restrictive as I originally thought they were and I have learned that the AEA Online site has a wealth of information that students and educators can use without having to be concerned that they are violating copyright laws.  I will do my part to ensure that students in my classroom are researching appropriately and will steer them toward resources available on the AEA Online site anytime possible.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Kbergeson
In reply to this post by eabbey
As an Associate I knew a little about copyright but I did not pay much attention I made copies of what I was told. Now that I have taken this course I know more.  I am only going use the AEA Sites and I will show the students how to access the AEA sites and use them for viewing. Since the AEA already has the filters in place.  It will be easier for all involved. There are so many sites through the AEA there should be no problem for them to find the information the needd
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Dawn Floy
In reply to this post by eabbey
After completing the copyright section, I understand the copyright law much better now.   I feel it's a very important topic to stress to students the correct information about copyright laws. I will recommend AEA online resources to students because AEA resources have been filtered and are not blocked and the material is safe for them to use. Copyright is very important because it promotes the creation of new ideas.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Chris Turner
In reply to this post by eabbey
In the classroom I will face a sticky question of who owns the visual, audio, and moving images I download and pop into presentations. If I am wrong I might receive a hefty fine and a severe mark against my reputation as a credible instructor. I would not be willing to ignore copyright laws but sometimes fair use or classroom use can be a bit hard to define. Changes that I will make will be to make sure everything relates back to the standards and curriculum I am teaching. I will plan to use Area Education Agency sites to download images, iClipart or sounds from.

My new rule of thumb regarding fair use will be to use as little as possible for as short of time as possible. Generally the more creative the work, the more it is protected. I will strongly recommend that my students use the Area Education Agency to download material from. I would also remind them to never share their account and password with anyone, to keep their computer up-to-date with security features, and to be sure they use a secure connection when using wireless networks.
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Re: POST #4: Copyright

Theresa Brood
In reply to this post by eabbey
I have to admit I was not familiar with the importance of Copyright law before this class. Fortunately for me as I was taking this class I have also been working with the science teacher that is also our Media Specialist. She drills the importance of Copyright laws to her students and she incorporated all sorts of AEA resources in the classroom because she knows they have filtered through this information and it is ready for use. I never knew this was the reason so many google sites were blocked at our school. It is so encouraging to see the teachers teaching what plagiarism is at an early age. With our cut and paste world we live in it is important to know it's ramifications. I know students go to Google as a quick fix and easy access but it is nice to know we can use these AEA resource and know it is safe. The information from this course was very informative.
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